Blog Tour Guest Post: Our House by Louise Candlish

Hi everyone,

Today I am delighted to be taking part in the blog tour for Our House by Louise Candlish. I’ll be sharing a guest post with you all further down, but first, its time for the all-important bookish information!

About the author:

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Louise Candlish is the bestselling author of twelve novels, including THE SUDDEN DEPARTURE OF THE FRASERS (2015) and THE SWIMMING POOL (2016). Her new thriller OUR HOUSE is published in the UK in April 2018 by Simon & Schuster.

Though her stories are about people facing dark dilemmas, Louise tries to get through the day without too much drama of her own. She lives in South London with her husband and daughter and is very attached to her dog Maggie and cat Tilly.

Follow her on Twitter at @louise_candlish or find out more at louisecandlish.com or facebook.com/LouiseCandlishAuthor.

About the book:

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FOR BETTER, FOR WORSE.
When Fi Lawson arrives home to find strangers moving into her house, she is plunged into terror and confusion. She and her husband Bram have owned their home on Trinity Avenue for years and have no intention of selling. How can this other family possibly think the house is theirs? And why has Bram disappeared when she needs him most?

FOR RICHER, FOR POORER.
Bram has made a catastrophic mistake and now he is paying. Unable to see his wife, his children or his home, he has nothing left but to settle scores. As the nightmare takes grip, both Bram and Fi try to make sense of the events that led to a devastating crime. What has he hidden from her – and what has she hidden from him? And will either survive the chilling truth – that there are far worse things you can lose than your house?

TILL DEATH US DO PART.

Our House by Louise Candlish

Over to Louise…

 

Top 5 properties in literature

 

Thornfield Hall in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Thornfield Hall is, of course, one of the classic houses of English literature, part of an august group that can be considered characters in their own right. A roll call of great mansions have followed, many with hauntings of one variety or another, but at Thornfield the hidden secret in all the more shocking for taking real bodily form. Jane’s own bond with Thornfield is powerful – ‘I grieve to leave’, she tells us – and we’ve all felt that sense of deep loss when we’ve left a place where we’ve been content.

 

Dr Jekyll’s house, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

In most crime and thriller novels, the monster behind closed doors is metaphorical: a shameful secret, a sense of jeopardy, an atmosphere of evil. Not so in Dr Jekyll’s Victorian London house. Though it ‘wore a great air of wealth and comfort’, there is attached to it sordid and rundown quarters where Jekyll’s murderous alter ego resides. Over 130 years later, readers are well advised to be on guard when encountering a desirable-sounding residence in their fiction: a respectable-looking house does not necessarily contain respectable people.

 

Manderley in Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

A quick Twitter straw poll before writing this confirmed Manderley to be the best-loved house in fiction (closely followed by Pemberley). A symmetrical edifice of grey stone, set in a natural paradise of woodland and coast, it is ‘secretive and silent’, the ultimate haunted house. It possesses the reader from the first line – the most famous of all first lines – and is all the more precious for being gone: ‘Manderley is no more’.

 

Malory Towers in the Malory Towers series by Enid Blyton

The first books I remember loving were the Enid Blyton boarding school series Malory Towers and St Clare’s. It’s Malory Towers that comes with a memorable sense of place: a great castle on a Cornish clifftop, its architecture likely inspired by Lulworth Castle in Dorset. And who can forget the swimming pool cut from the rocks, where poor friendless Gwendoline Mary almost drowns?

 

51 Pepys Road in Capital by John Lanchester

Adorned with all the status symbols of the noughties’ affluent classes, including a sleek German kitchen and a Damien Hirst Spot painting, the Younts’ Clapham house has already had £650,000 lavished on ‘work’. When we first go inside 51 Pepys Road, Arabella Yount is putting up shelves in the store cupboard ‘she liked to call her pantry’ (the rustic pretensions of the urban middle class!) while plotting to give her husband a nasty shock. He’s not the only one to get what’s coming to him in this superb satire.

 Many thanks to Louise Candlish for this great post, and to Jess Barratt for letting me take part 😊

 

Make sure to check out the blog tour:

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