The Woman in the Window by AJ Finn

AJ Finn

*Many thanks to the publisher for my review copy!

About the book:

What did she see?

It’s been ten long months since Anna Fox last left her home. Ten months during which she has haunted the rooms of her old New York house like a ghost, lost in her memories, too terrified to step outside.

Anna’s lifeline to the real world is her window, where she sits day after day, watching her neighbours. When the Russells move in, Anna is instantly drawn to them. A picture-perfect family of three, they are an echo of the life that was once hers.

But one evening, a frenzied scream rips across the silence, and Anna witnesses something no one was supposed to see. Now she must do everything she can to uncover the truth about what really happened. But even if she does, will anyone believe her? And can she even trust herself?

Published by Harper Collins, click the link below to order your copy:

The Woman In The Window by A. J. Finn

My thoughts:

The Woman in the Widow has been garnering the highest of praise pre-publication and has been (rightly) compared to The Girl on the Train and others of its ilk. The comparisons are spot on, because The Woman in the Window is definitely going to be familiar to those of you who have read the speight of “Girl” books. The author, Dan Mallory writing as A. J. Finn, is the first to say that without those books, he wouldn’t have written this one.

I don’t do well with hyped books lately, so I went into The Woman in the Window thinking I wasn’t going to get on with it. Fast forward to 24 hours later, and I have blasted through it. Once I started reading it, I genuinely couldn’t stop. It was almost a compulsion, I couldn’t put it down until I finished it!

The Woman in the Window has the usual psychological thriller tropes. An unreliable narrator, divisive characters, twisting narrative plus an interesting back story. But, the skill of the writer here is that although they have been done before, Finn manages to keep it fresh and intriguing.

I enjoyed this one. I can see how the world is going mad for it. It is a brilliantly commercial psychological thriller, easy to read and very satisfying. If you like Gillian Flynn, Paula Hawkins and so on, you will love this one!

Recommended!

 

 

Fragile Lives by Stephen Westaby

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*Many thanks to the lovely folks at Harper Collins Non-Fiction for my review copy*

About the book:

An incredible memoir from one of the world’s most eminent heart surgeons and some of the most remarkable and poignant cases he’s worked on.

Grim Reaper sits on the heart surgeon’s shoulder. A slip of the hand and life ebbs away.

The balance between life and death is so delicate, and the heart surgeon walks that rope between the two. In the operating room there is no time for doubt. It is flesh, blood, rib-retractors and pumping the vital organ with your bare hand to squeeze the life back into it. An off-day can have dire consequences – this job has a steep learning curve, and the cost is measured in human life. Cardiac surgery is not for the faint of heart.

Professor Stephen Westaby took chances and pushed the boundaries of heart surgery. He saved hundreds of lives over the course of a thirty-five year career and now, in his astounding memoir, Westaby details some of his most remarkable and poignant cases – such as the baby who had suffered multiple heart attacks by six months old, a woman who lived the nightmare of locked-in syndrome, and a man whose life was powered by a battery for eight years.

A powerful, important and incredibly moving book, Fragile Lives offers an exceptional insight into the exhilarating and sometimes tragic world of heart surgery, and how it feels to hold someone’s life in your hands.

Fragile Lives is out Feb 9th and you can get your copy by clicking HERE.

My thoughts:

Anyone who reads my blog will know that I rarely, if ever, review non-fiction. It is definitely not my usual genre, but when I saw it pop up on Twitter recently, I was suitably intrigued. I am so SO GLAD I got the chance to read and review Fragile Lives.

Fragile Lives is a memoir written by Stephen Westaby, one of the most well known cardiac surgeons and hugely prolific in his chosen field. A trailblazer from very early on in his career, he continued to pave the way for the use of new and unknown cardiac treatments and apparatus.

I started it Monday morning, and by Monday night I was a ball of emotions upon finishing it. Every chapter is a case story, and every case is heartbreaking yet life-affirming, if that makes sense. I found myself close to tears on more than one occasion on Monday, knowing that these are real people and they were meeting Westaby at possibly the worst moment of their lives.

The details in Fragile Lives are extremely in depth, especially with regards to the surgeries and various diseases/injuries that are discussed in the book. While it was descriptive, it was not by any means difficult to follow. It was very interesting to read about the anatomy of the heart and the various pathologies Westaby writes about.

I can’t do this book justice with my words. It was truly excellent to read. I was compelled to read it, trapped in the intensity of the chapters. When I had to put it down, I immediately wished I was reading it again. That is always a sign of a great book. If you like medicine, with a large dose of humanity, then pick up Fragile Lives.

Highly recommended!

The 3rd Woman by Jonathan Freedland

First off, my thanks to Hayley at Harper Collins for my review copy!

 

About the book (via Goodreads)

The United States have yielded to the People’s Republic of China – Beijing has written off trillions of dollars of US debt in return for a permanent military presence on US soil. America is now a former global superpower, dependent on and junior to China. And the evidence – cultural and political – is everywhere.

Madison Webb is a work-obsessed journalist who will do anything to get to the heart of a story; to expose lies and corruption. When her sister is brutally murdered, the police seem too eager to write it up as an isolated incident. Madison starts digging and uncovers a series of similar rape-murder cases.

As her investigation beings to attract the media spotlight, Madison draws the attention of some powerful people. And when she reveals the link between the victims, Madison will find out that the Chinese military makes for a terrifying enemy…


My thoughts:

The 3rd Woman is an intriguing book. Were introduced to Madison Webb, avid reporter but has her own issues going on.

When her sister gets murdered, Madison begins a crusade to find her sisters killer. Stopping at nothing, she incurs the wrath of people with more power than she ever expected.

During the course of her investigation, Madison finds a tenuous link between her sisters murder, and the murders of two other women, whose deaths essentially passed under the radar.

The 3rd Woman is a tense read, filled with political agendas and media politics. It touches on drugs, conspiracies and hacking throughout the course of the story which sends the reader off on tangents to try and figure out what’s going on.

I found the book to be a good read, not my usual genre (I tend to avoid anything with politics as it’s just a subject I can’t ever get to grips with!!!) but it still delivered a decent plot with an ending that I wasn’t expecting if I’m honest.

I gave The 3rd Woman 3⭐️ on Goodreads.

It’s released in paperback today and you can buy your copy HERE


Depraved Heart by Patricia Cornwell ***BLOG TOUR***

Hi everyone!

I’m thrilled to be the first stop on the blog tour for the new Patricia Cornwell book, Depraved Heart. This is the 23rd (can you believe that?!) instalment of the Scarpetta series. I’ve been a fan of Cornwell’s books for as long as I can remember, and I’ve read all of this series. Needless to say, I was delighted to be given the opportunity to take part in the blog tour. My thanks to Hayley Camis and Harper Collins for my review copy of Depraved Heart.

List of bloggers taking part and where to find them:


 

About the author:

Patricia Cornwell has sold over 100 million books and had 29 New York Times bestsellers, including Dust, The Bone Bed, Red Mist and Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper- Case Closed. Postmortem is the only novel to win five major crime awards in a single year and Cruel and Unusual won Britain’s prestigious Gold Dagger Award for the best crime novel. Fox 2000 have bought the rights to Kay Scarpetta to be developed for the big screen. When not writing from her Boston home, she is tirelessly researching cutting edge forensics to include in her work. Currently researching drone technology as well as continuing her work in ballistics, explosives and firearms, Cornwell has also been learning about advanced trauma for the emergency responder through simulation technology, working with the Special Weapons and Tactics (S.W.A.T) department, training on the VirFa Firearms Training Simulators as well as Scuba Diving in Bermuda.

 

Photo Credit: Patrick Ecclesine 2015 ©


About the book:
Dr. Kay Scarpetta is working a suspicious death scene in Cambridge, Massachusetts when an emergency alert sounds on her phone. A video link lands in her text messages and seems to be from her computer genius niece Lucy. But how can it be? It’s clearly a surveillance film of Lucy taken almost twenty years ago.

As Scarpetta watches she begins to learn frightening secrets about her niece, whom she has loved and raised like a daughter. That film clip and then others sent soon after raise dangerous legal implications that increasingly isolate Scarpetta and leave her confused, worried, and not knowing where to turn. She doesn’t know whom she can tell – not her FBI husband Benton Wesley or her investigative partner Pete Marino. Not even Lucy.

My thoughts:

Following on from Flesh and Blood, Depraved Heart picks up two months after the events involving the Copperhead Killer. Dr. Kay Scarpetta is called to a suspicious death in Cambridge. A film mogul’s daughter is found dead in her home and Scarpetta and Marino attend the scene.

Within minutes of beginning her exam, Scarpetta receives a message on her phone from her niece Lucy’s ICE with a video link. The accompanying footage makes her question those around her and who to trust.

Simultaneously, Lucy’s home is being raided by the FBI. With worry setting in, Scarpetta rushes through her examination of the scene in order to go over to Lucy’s house, not knowing about the raid.

This book essentially takes place over the course of one day. It is full of forensic detail, the kind you usually expect from Cornwell. At times, it’s difficult to take in all that gets written, but it’s good to know the reasoning behind the forensic processes.

I really enjoyed Depraved Heart. More so than Flesh and Blood. It’s full of psychological warfare as the characters don’t know who to trust, and an old nemesis resurfaces, testing everyone. There are some unexpected twists and turns along the way which make for interesting asides.

My only issue with Depraved Heart was that once you get to the climax of the story, it ends very quickly. I would have liked a little more explanation of certain events, but that’s personal preference.

I gave Depraved Heart 4⭐️ on Goodreads. It was a highly enjoyable story and I’m very grateful to Harper Collins for my copy!

Happy Reading 😊📖